Goodyear Eagle Sport All-Seson tire test report #2
03 Apr

Extended Test of New Goodyear Eagle Sport All-Season Tires

6 Month Progress Report – April 3, 2014

Goodyear introduced an all-season model of their Eagle Sport tires and was kind enough to provide us with a set for long-term testing. This addition to the Goodyear tire family falls into their high performance all-season category. Essentially, it replaces the Eagle GT as a mid-level tire and falls below the Eagle F1 Asymetrical All-Season tire in the performance group, but above the value-oriented tires. This  is our third update in a series of four  reports. After six months we drove 4,000 miles under mostly dry conditions and the tires are still performing brilliantly.

We were concerned that testing the tires under wet conditions in a state that is experiencing far-below average rainfall and instituting mandatory water rationing would ruin an important part of the test. Fortunately, the skies have opened up and Northern California has been getting some much needed rain.

goodyear eagle tire test 30 800x800 600x450 Extended Test of New Goodyear Eagle Sport All Season Tires

For the Eagle Sport All-Season tires, the engineers at Goodyear settled on an asymmetrical tire design that offers a blend of wet and dry handling. Sipes, or blades, are cut throughout the tread pattern and penetrate the entire tread depth for ice and snow traction. Goodyear claims this tire is significantly better in snow, ice, and heavy rain than major competitor’s sport all-season tires.

With months of driving on dry pavement, we noticed performance on wet roads was only slightly diminished. Wet or dry, the front end does a good job of maintaining traction on the corners. Even with a little less traction, the Goodyear  tires still felt pliable and was able to hold a line through the wet corners. At the opposite end, the rear tires held on just as well as the front. Getting the rear end to rotate with a FWD car on wet roads still took some skill. Only by over-driving could we really get the rear end to oversteer dramatically.

goodyear eagle tire test 32 600x450 Extended Test of New Goodyear Eagle Sport All Season Tires

So far, we like how well-planted and predictable the Eagle Sport A/S tires perform under wet and dry road conditions. If you’re seeking replacement tires that have increased traction on wet and damp roads, this could be the answer to ditching those OEM or worn tires for something that performs well in all but the worst conditions.

  Mileage Tread Depth (front tires) Tread Depth (rear tires)
New 0 10/32 inch 10/32 inch
3 months 2,500 10/32 inch 10/32 inch
6 months 4,200 10/32 inch 10/32 inch

FAST FACTS: Goodyear Eagle Sport All-Season Tire

  1. Tire includes latest Goodyear TripleTred, ComforTred, Fuel Max, TredLock, and Durawall technologies.
  2. Much improved snow and ice performance over old Eagle GT (source: Goodyear)
  3. Eagle Sport A/S tire carries a 50,000 mile tread life limited warranty
  4. Prices start at $100 a tire

Continue to next page to read our 3 month progress report of the Eagle Sport All-Season tires

continue button 90x25 Extended Test of New Goodyear Eagle Sport All Season Tires

Pages: 1 2 3

Tags: , , , , , ,

Category: Reviews

Comments (7)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

Sites That Link to this Post

  1. Machined Surface Tolerance Blog | November 13, 2013
    • Derek Mau says:

      I looked at the Youtube video about the Bridgestone Potenza RE960AS RFT tires. Not sure what you were trying to convey, but the video is a poor piece of information about the tires. I see a couple of BMW 3-series lapping around some cones – no times, no comparison to other tires, no commentary with regards to grip, traction, turn-in response, noise, and nothing about wet traction performance which is where an all-season tire is supposed to excel. Plus, Bridgestone run-flat tires are the worst with regards to road noise and road compliance (e.g. too stiff and bouncy).

  1. Scottwax says:

    I’ve had the Goodyear Eagle Sport A/S tires on my ’04 V6 Accord about 7-8 weeks and 2000 miles now. Grip was good enough to show some shortcomings in my stock suspension so I added a TL-S rear anti-roll bar and an aftermarket front strut bar so I could better take advantage of the grip. Lane changes and cornering are noticeably superior (even before the suspension upgrades) to the previous tires, Yokohama YK580′s. Wider tread too. I did go from a 205/60/16 to 215/55/16 tire size, but even if I stayed with the 205/60/16 size, I still would have picked up 0.8″ in tread width. These tires are vastly superior in the rain, especially from a stop. The YK580s were very prone to wheel spin in the rain (and on dry pavement), the Eagle Sports take much more throttle to get loose. We actually had about an inch of snow the other day here in north Texas, no issues driving on snowy streets. Another nice thing about the Eagles is how quiet they are. I take 2-3 long road trips a year so a lack of tire roar is a huge plus.

    Really a huge surprise to me how good these tires are. Not much information online since they are pretty new and you never know how much of what people notice in new tires is a placebo effect. But these tires, after living with them almost two months, are the real deal.

    • Derek Mau says:

      Scott,

      Thanks giving us your impressions. Good to hear that your experience has been as good as ours.

      It has finally started raining after a very dry winter. Now finally I can do some wet pavement testing. Next report, which will include wet performance, will be published next month.

  2. Boice says:

    I’ve been pretty happy with my Eagle Sport A/S. Road feel is really good, and they performed more than adequately in the snow. I live in upstate NY, so I’ve had plenty winter driving this year. Dry traction is also great with very controlled and predictable understeer. Oddly though the performance in wet/cold conditions is pretty poor. I experienced complete understeer on a couple occasions that were cold but not quite freezing. Granted, my car is very prone to understeering due to it’s very front biased weight distribution (64/36)

    With ~3,000 miles on these tires I’ve got 8/32nds tread depth on my front wheels, and 10/32nds on the rear. That probably sounds really bad, but my last set of tires were Nexen 5000s rated at 60k miles, and I got 9k out of them before they were toast. No joke.

  3. Michael Oliva says:

    Hello,
    Just replaced my Goodyear Eagle GT’s with the new Eagle Sports. I only got 35,000 miles from them but Goodyear did prorate it and gave me $25 dollars off per tire. Loved my Eagle GTs just hoping the new replacements will get closer to the 50,000 mile warranty.

    Looking Forward,
    Michael

Leave a Reply

eBay Motors Mobile App - Available on the itunes App Store
;